Complete List of Hiking Gear

Being a 46er, I’ve acquired a lot of GEAR! And, I happen to be a gear junkie. Fortunately, I can find pretty good deals online at sites such as Sierra Trading Post, Steep & Cheap, and REI Garage, so I’ve never paid full price for anything except for maybe a water filter. But if you found my blog because you’re looking to hike the 46 high peaks, look no further! Here I’m going to tell you what I find essential to bring on hikes and overnight backpacking trips. I don’t have the most lightweight and technically-advanced gear, so if you’re like me and have a budget, this is the list for you. PS: none of this gear is sponsored! I’m providing the links to everything so you know where it can be purchased.

Gear for day hikes

Osprey Mira 25 L day hiking pack

I recently upgraded my pack when the zipper broke on my beloved Osprey Sirrus daypack. This pack is bigger by only one liter, but has more pockets. It also has Osprey’s anti-gravity system, making it a comfortable choice on the trail. So far, I really like it. It came with the 2.5 L Osprey Hydraulics reservoir which I bring with me on hikes < 10 miles long.

Other items I bring on day hikes:
3 L Big Zip Platypus reservoir for hikes > 10 miles long + 1 liter Nalgene water bottle
Kelty trekking poles (these poles save your knees on those steep, rocky descents!)
Keene Durand hiking boots (I think they have come to their end of life after hiking 30-some high peaks and numerous other hikes. I’ve switched to the Keen Logan hiking boots, and I’ve only worn them for a few hikes so the verdict is still out on them!)
Salomon Ellipse Aero hiking shoes (I wear these on shorter hikes as they are a lot more light-weight than my other boots.)

Gear for backpacking trips/winter hikes

backpacking gear – dog not included

Gregory Amber 34 L pack  (This is my recently upgraded backpacking (1-2 nights) pack, also used for winter day hikes when I have to carry a lot more gear, like crampons and my Jetboil! Tent and sleeping pad easily attach to this pack, while the sleeping bag fits at the bottom.)
Backpack’s Cache Bear Canister (this bear can is approved for use in the Adirondacks, where black bears are active – I’m going to purchase a carrying case for my bear canister so it can be attached to the pack easier–just make sure to remove the case when storing your bear can so the bear doesn’t walk away with your food.)
1 L insulated Hydroflask water bottle (great for winter hikes because it prevents your water from freezing  and great hot day hikes because it keeps drinks cold when you add ice)
Jetboil Zip cooking system
MSR Miniworks water filter pump
Kelty Grand Mesa 2 three-season two-person tent
Kelty Tuck 22 degree sleeping bag
Alps Mountaineering lightweight sleeping pad (I don’t love this sleeping pad, so I’m in the process of upgrading!)
CAMP crampons (for winter hikes)
Kahtoola microspikes (for late fall/winter/spring hikes)
Thermos Stainless Steel 16 oz Insulated food jar (for winter hikes)
Thermos Stainless Steel 16 oz Insulated drink bottle (for winter hikes)

Clothing
Wool hiking socks and EMS sock liners
EMS Compass Trek Hiking Pants
Any tech-wick tank or t-shirt for summer hikes
EMS Excel 1/4 Zip Fleece Lined Hoodie (for cold weather hikes)
Marmot Snow Queen Ski Jacket (for winter hikes)
LL Bean Sweater Fleece Down Jacket (for cold weather hikes)
Northface rain shell (always keep in my pack)

What I keep in my pack at all times
Map, compass, matches, firestarter kit, pocket knife, first aid kit, blister kit, ACE bandage
Emergency bivvy
Titanium mug
SPOT Gen3 Satellite GPS Messenger
Northface rain shell
Extra socks and long sleeve shirt
Extra energy bars
Sunblock, body glide (to prevent chafing!) bug spray & tick remover
In the winter: hand warmers, Jetboil, extra gloves


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